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Adverse Childhood Experiences, Depression and Mental Health Barriers to Work among Low-Income Women

Recent research has connected childhood abuse to decreased physical and mental health for low-income women in Utah. Further, mental health has established a link to employment problems. This study conducted a secondary analysis of data collected from individuals accessing public assistance to investigate the relationships among retrospective self-reports of childhood emotional, physical and sexual abuse and prospective indicators of mental health and mental health barriers to work. Logistic regression models found strong relationships between childhood abuse and increased odds of depression and mental health barriers to work. Path models highlight the relative importance of depression for those reporting mental health as the biggest barrier to work. Recommendations for social workers, public health professionals, and program administrators are provided.

CITATION

Christopher Cambron, Christina Gringeri & Mary Beth Vogel-Ferguson (2015) Adverse Childhood Experiences, Depression and Mental Health Barriers to Work among Low-Income Women, Social Work in Public Health, 30:6, 504-515, DOI: 10.1080/19371918.2015.1073645

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Last Updated: 9/16/19