Relegating Refugees to Waiting

By Caren J. Frost, PhD, MPH, Director of the Center for Research on Migration & Refugee Integration, University of Utah College of Social Work   On Friday, January 27, President Trump issued an executive order titled “Protecting the Nation from Foreign Terrorist Entry into the United States.”  At first read, this executive order is troubling…
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UCJC to play key role as county moves to reduce homelessness and criminal behavior

This morning Salt Lake County Mayor Ben McAdams announced the launch of two new Pay for Success initiatives to address two long-running challenges: persistent homelessness and adults with repeat stays in jail.  The programs—operated by local nonprofits The Road Home and First Step House—will be independently evaluated by the Utah Criminal Justice Center at the…
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Independence in Older Adults

By Beth Adair, Master of Social Work Student, 2016-2017 George S. and Delores Doré Eccles Neighbors Helping Neighbors Scholar   For the past seven months, I have been blessed with the opportunity to work with older adults through the University of Utah College of Social Work’s Neighbor’s Helping Neighbors (NHN) program. This experience has provided…
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Remembering Gene Wilder

By Troy Andersen, PhD, LCSW, Director of the W.D. Goodwill Initiatives on Aging, University of Utah College of Social Work   One of the most memorable scenes from the 1974 classic “Young Frankenstein” was when Dr. Frankenstein (Gene Wilder) sent Igor (Marty Feldman) in search of a brain for his greatest scientific experiment: creating life….
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Micro Losses: The Effects of Repeated Physical and Relational Losses

By Sarah Stephenson, MSW Student, 2015-2016 George S. and Dolores Doré Eccles Neighbors Helping Neighbors Scholar   Loss happens during every stage of life.  As a person begins to age, they learn to adapt to many different types of loss including physical, social, and emotional losses.  Some of these losses may even go to the…
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Utah’s Invisible Population

By Charles Hoy-Ellis, PhD, Assistant Professor, University of Utah College of Social Work   Lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender (LGBT) adults aged 50 and older are at significantly greater risk for poor mental and physical health outcomes compared to same-age older heterosexual adults; not because they are LGBT, but as a result of the direct…
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Five Ways to Make Your Resume Stand Out

By Ella Butler, Career Coach at University of Utah Career Services   Hello from your Career Services Coach! As you gear up for Social Work Career Prep Month, I wanted to provide some tips & tricks to help make your resume stand out. FIVE WAYS TO MAKE YOUR RESUME STAND OUT: Tailor your resume to…
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2016 SUNDANCE FOR SOCIAL WORKERS

Fresh snow and blue skies provide the perfect backdrop for the glitterati, the independent, and the inspiring who are visiting Park City and Salt Lake City for the Sundance Film Festival. Over the last 31 years, the annual festival has served as a venue for thousands of unknown voices to share unique, creative, and powerful…
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Can Mindfulness Help us Cope with Tragedy?

Can mindfulness help us cope with tragedy? According to a new theory proposed by Dr. Eric Garland and colleagues, yes. Mindfulness-to-Meaning Theory (MMT) is the subject of the target paper for the latest issue of the journal Psychological Inquiry, released this month. The theory describes the psychological and neurobiological mechanisms of using mindfulness to de-center…
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We Are Not All Terrorists: Islamophobia and Recognizing Religious Privilege in the U.S.

By Orlando Avila, BSW Student   In December, many of us are surrounded by joy and optimism, as we finish our studies and spend time with our families, enjoying the holiday season. As a Christian-privileging nation, typically, little attention is paid to other non-Christian religions. Often, when other religions are recognized, negative remarks are made…
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