Clinical Director Utah Health and Human Rights

Description

Salary: DOE
Job Description: Clinical Director
Utah Health and Human Rights Project (UHHR)

Department and location: UHHR Clinical Program, Salt Lake City, Utah
Category and Status: Regular, full-time at 40 hours/week, exempt
Salary: Competitive based on qualifications and experience
Reports to: Executive Director

Job Summary: The Clinical Director oversees and manages all aspects of clinical services provided to UHHR torture, war trauma, and asylum clients; with a strong focus on cross-cultural and multidisciplinary approaches. The Clinical Director will be responsible for ensuring that UHHR’s clinical program is relevant, up to date and meets agency and funder goals. All staff and volunteers providing clinical services will be trained and supervised by the Clinical Director, and will receive appropriate supervisory hours as needed, as required by licensure. The Clinical Director will play an integral role in overall agency program and strategic planning.

Specific responsibilities include:
1) Job Specific Duties:

Program Leadership
• Collaborate with local and national mental health organizations and academic institutions to ensure that UHHR delivers outstanding and evidence-based mental health interventions
• Provide oversight and direction for clinical services provided to UHHR clients, including: asylum seekers, torture survivors, and survivors of severe war trauma
• Lead a collaborative, multi-disciplinary clinical approach that addresses and meets the unique needs of clients seeking rehabilitative services at UHHR

Direct Client Services
• Provide and oversee the clinical assessment of and treatment for UHHR clients
• Oversee the development and implementation of a treatment plan for each client in conjunction with clinical staff
• Provide direct psycho-therapy to clients in group and individual settings

Indirect Client Services
• Know and understand eligibility requirements and documentation for torture and asylum
• Collaborate with case workers at refugee/immigrant serving agencies to coordinate and/or reduce duplication of services for clients
• Keep updated and detailed client files on each client in caseload and clear and concise case notes
• Record services for each client for each client in Salesforce. Records are current on a weekly basis.
• Respond accordingly to inquiries from the community on UHHR services

Staff Leadership and Management
• Hire and supervise counselors, therapists, case managers, students and volunteers
• Ensure that staff are aware of agency goals as related to program funders; that staff track and report outcomes to director in a timely manner, and program outcomes are in line with agency and funder goals
• Provide assistance to staff/volunteers with regards to secondary trauma
• Run regular clinical meetings

Program Support
• Participate as an active member of the leadership team to advise program and strategic planning and evaluation
• Perform related duties as assigned

2) Client Care and Safety:
• Maintain stringent client confidentiality both in and outside of the office and keep clinical staff up to date on UHHR policies and procedures related to client care and safety
• Adhere to UHHR security protocol and recommend revisions as necessary
• Conduct services in a culturally-appropriate manner
• Adhere to code of conduct and recommend revisions as necessary
• Instruct and guide clinical staff on best practices ensuring that clients receive culturally and linguistically appropriate services

3) Agency Responsibilities:
• Ensure clinical staff work collaboratively for program and agency goals
• Attend, lead, and participate in regular staff meetings
• Answer phone calls, greet clients and make referrals within the agency
• Contribute to UHHR’s mission and programs as needed
• Contribute ideas to program planning and assist the program in meetings its goals
• Adhere to agency policy and procedure manual and keep staff updated on changes
• Attend outreach events and present on agency services as needed
• Promote and represent the agency in a positive, pro-active way
• Instruct clinical staff on how to follow program protocol and chain of command
• Maintain a culture of respect, honesty and dignity with co-workers and clients
• Other duties as assigned

4) Professional Development:
• Maintain licensure/credentials as needed
• Attend trainings relevant to job function, as supported by the budget

5) Record-keeping and Reporting:
• Maintain client data in the database
• Keep client files and case notes up to date and in accordance with program policies
• Submit reports and all administrative documentation in a timely manner

Supervisory Responsibilities
The Clinical Director supervises all staff and volunteers providing clinical services

Qualifications:
Experience
• Cross-cultural and trauma experience a must, preferably with experience in the mental health issues of refugees or torture/severe war trauma survivors
• At least 5 years’ experience providing direct client therapy
• Program development and strong leadership experience a must, including ability to work creatively, adaptively and under pressure
• Proven ability to develop and run a clinical program in various stages of development
• Ability to coordinate and implement client treatment plans, and assess progress toward goals
• Ability to address clinical issues through a multi-cultural lens
• Computer skills including email, power point, and word processing
• International experience or strong background working within diverse communities
• Experience working in a non-profit and leading a team
• Ability to educate, train and provide constructive feedback in a manner which will increase staff ability to accomplish the responsibilities of their positions

Skills and Attributes
• Commitment to immerse oneself in the field of torture treatment and immigrant mental health
• Ability to motivate staff and provide constructive feedback
• Strong organizational skills
• Stay up to date with evidence based methods
• Interest/skills in community mental health approaches
• Work comfortably with interpreters
• Strong and proven interest in issues of political torture and the health consequences of human rights abuses

Education
• LCSW preferred but PhD or master’s level therapists will be considered
• Candidate must be licensed and certified to provide direct mental health services to clients

Physical Requirements:
The employee may sit comfortably to perform work. He/she will also walk, stand, bend and carry light items. The employee will be required to drive an automobile. Special physical demands are not required to perform the responsibilities of this position.

Working Conditions:
Duties are performed in an office setting and in locations outside of the office. Risks associated with this position are those found in the typical office setting.

Other:
Criminal background check, a valid driver’s license and current automobile insurance is required.

Location: Salt Lake City

Information

How to Apply: Send cover letter and resume to heidi.justice@uhhr.org
Closing Date: Open until filled
Your Website: Visit organizational website.
Job Post Link: Visit additional job posting information.

Clinical Director Utah Health and Human Rights

Description

Salary: DOE
Job Description: Clinical Director
Utah Health and Human Rights Project (UHHR)

Department and location: UHHR Clinical Program, Salt Lake City, Utah
Category and Status: Regular, full-time at 40 hours/week, exempt
Salary: Competitive based on qualifications and experience
Reports to: Executive Director

Job Summary: The Clinical Director oversees and manages all aspects of clinical services provided to UHHR torture, war trauma, and asylum clients; with a strong focus on cross-cultural and multidisciplinary approaches. The Clinical Director will be responsible for ensuring that UHHR’s clinical program is relevant, up to date and meets agency and funder goals. All staff and volunteers providing clinical services will be trained and supervised by the Clinical Director, and will receive appropriate supervisory hours as needed, as required by licensure. The Clinical Director will play an integral role in overall agency program and strategic planning.

Specific responsibilities include: 
1) Job Specific Duties:

Program Leadership
• Collaborate with local and national mental health organizations and academic institutions to ensure that UHHR delivers outstanding and evidence-based mental health interventions
• Provide oversight and direction for clinical services provided to UHHR clients, including: asylum seekers, torture survivors, and survivors of severe war trauma
• Lead a collaborative, multi-disciplinary clinical approach that addresses and meets the unique needs of clients seeking rehabilitative services at UHHR

Direct Client Services
• Provide and oversee the clinical assessment of and treatment for UHHR clients
• Oversee the development and implementation of a treatment plan for each client in conjunction with clinical staff 
• Provide direct psycho-therapy to clients in group and individual settings

Indirect Client Services
• Know and understand eligibility requirements and documentation for torture and asylum
• Collaborate with case workers at refugee/immigrant serving agencies to coordinate and/or reduce duplication of services for clients 
• Keep updated and detailed client files on each client in caseload and clear and concise case notes
• Record services for each client for each client in Salesforce. Records are current on a weekly basis.
• Respond accordingly to inquiries from the community on UHHR services

Staff Leadership and Management
• Hire and supervise counselors, therapists, case managers, students and volunteers
• Ensure that staff are aware of agency goals as related to program funders; that staff track and report outcomes to director in a timely manner, and program outcomes are in line with agency and funder goals 
• Provide assistance to staff/volunteers with regards to secondary trauma
• Run regular clinical meetings 

Program Support
• Participate as an active member of the leadership team to advise program and strategic planning and evaluation
• Perform related duties as assigned

2) Client Care and Safety:
• Maintain stringent client confidentiality both in and outside of the office and keep clinical staff up to date on UHHR policies and procedures related to client care and safety
• Adhere to UHHR security protocol and recommend revisions as necessary
• Conduct services in a culturally-appropriate manner
• Adhere to code of conduct and recommend revisions as necessary
• Instruct and guide clinical staff on best practices ensuring that clients receive culturally and linguistically appropriate services

3) Agency Responsibilities:
• Ensure clinical staff work collaboratively for program and agency goals 
• Attend, lead, and participate in regular staff meetings
• Answer phone calls, greet clients and make referrals within the agency
• Contribute to UHHR’s mission and programs as needed
• Contribute ideas to program planning and assist the program in meetings its goals
• Adhere to agency policy and procedure manual and keep staff updated on changes
• Attend outreach events and present on agency services as needed
• Promote and represent the agency in a positive, pro-active way
• Instruct clinical staff on how to follow program protocol and chain of command
• Maintain a culture of respect, honesty and dignity with co-workers and clients
• Other duties as assigned

4) Professional Development:
• Maintain licensure/credentials as needed
• Attend trainings relevant to job function, as supported by the budget

5) Record-keeping and Reporting:
• Maintain client data in the database
• Keep client files and case notes up to date and in accordance with program policies
• Submit reports and all administrative documentation in a timely manner

Supervisory Responsibilities
The Clinical Director supervises all staff and volunteers providing clinical services 

Qualifications:
Experience
• Cross-cultural and trauma experience a must, preferably with experience in the mental health issues of refugees or torture/severe war trauma survivors
• At least 5 years’ experience providing direct client therapy
• Program development and strong leadership experience a must, including ability to work creatively, adaptively and under pressure
• Proven ability to develop and run a clinical program in various stages of development
• Ability to coordinate and implement client treatment plans, and assess progress toward goals
• Ability to address clinical issues through a multi-cultural lens
• Computer skills including email, power point, and word processing
• International experience or strong background working within diverse communities
• Experience working in a non-profit and leading a team
• Ability to educate, train and provide constructive feedback in a manner which will increase staff ability to accomplish the responsibilities of their positions

Skills and Attributes
• Commitment to immerse oneself in the field of torture treatment and immigrant mental health
• Ability to motivate staff and provide constructive feedback
• Strong organizational skills
• Stay up to date with evidence based methods
• Interest/skills in community mental health approaches
• Work comfortably with interpreters
• Strong and proven interest in issues of political torture and the health consequences of human rights abuses

Education
• LCSW preferred but PhD or master’s level therapists will be considered
• Candidate must be licensed and certified to provide direct mental health services to clients

Physical Requirements:
The employee may sit comfortably to perform work. He/she will also walk, stand, bend and carry light items. The employee will be required to drive an automobile. Special physical demands are not required to perform the responsibilities of this position.

Working Conditions:
Duties are performed in an office setting and in locations outside of the office. Risks associated with this position are those found in the typical office setting.

Other:
Criminal background check, a valid driver’s license and current automobile insurance is required.
Location: Salt Lake City

Information

How to Apply: Send cover letter and resume to heidi.justice@uhhr.org
Closing Date: Open until filled
Your WebsiteVisit organizational website.
Job Post LinkVisit additional job posting information.

Linguistic Power: What the Executive Orders Tell Us about Views of Immigrants

By Lauren Brocious, Linguistics Student, Volunteer Research Assistant with the Center for Research on Migration & Refugee Integration

 

Power. At the core of so much of our human struggling is power, the desire to have it and the ability to wield it over others. Power has as many forms as there are people seeking after it, and one of our greatest (and most powerful) skills as a human race is our ability to control our world through language. No other species on earth can in such precise yet voluminous ways mold sounds into symbols with limitless meaning and nuance. This power is a tool, but it can also be a weapon.

Language is a powerful force in the creation of culture. In many ways, language is shaped by cultural values of a particular group, but there is also a deep relationship between the cultivation of cultural values as a direct result of language. When the language being circulated is violent and hateful, then the culture also becomes a culture of violence and hate. And culture, as the total sum of values and behaviors of a specific group of people, leads directly to actions and reactions which, in many cases, can be explosive. This, I fear, is what we are seeing right now in the United States and all over the world in respect to the “migrant crisis.”

You hear it every day on news outlets, blogs, social media posts in the United States: “illegal immigrants are destroying the American economy,” “immigrants commit murders and rapes and wreak havoc on American communities,” “Muslim jihadists are sneaking in to create terror in the US,” and on and on. This is the language we heard during the campaign, and it seems to be continuing to be used during this administration.

Curious as to how the recent executive orders issued in January and March of this year are playing a role in perpetuating the cycle of hateful language and violent reactions toward immigrants and refugees in the United States, I undertook a linguistic analysis of the orders to assess what kind of language is used to frame these ideas. The orders are, after all, titled “Protecting the Nation from Foreign Terrorist Entry into the United States,” so my aim was to discover the linguistic patterns employed to talk about people entering the country as immigrants and refugees in relation to the concept of terrorism in the United States. I compared the two orders to see which patterns were consistent and what sort of differences exist in their language and structure, and I also combined them to see what kind of language is most common between them as a whole in this specific context. Most importantly, I wanted to see how the power dynamics of U.S. government versus “criminal migrant” play out in the language of the text.

My analysis has two parts, and as a linguistic analysis, I focus on examining word choice and sentence structure in order to see what underlying assumptions are being made and conveyed by the “speakers” or authors of the orders. Because language is, in a way, a reflection of how the speaker conceptualizes their identity and perception of reality, an analysis of the structure of language output can shed some light on how the speaker is building these concepts through language. For example, someone who is giving a public speech will alter their language to be more formal and structured thereby reflecting their identity as an information-providing-speech-giver in that moment. Conversely, someone who is speaking to a child may select different words or sentence structures in order to reflect their concept of what is proper speech for a child. Along these same lines of reasoning, I looked at word choice and sentence structure of the executive orders in order to see what sorts of identities and assumptions are made by the speakers in this particular context.

Word Choice Analysis

The first element I looked at was the number of occurrences of words such as “terrorist” or “terrorism” in proportion to words such as “refugee” and “immigration” within each order to see how often these words occur in relation to each other and if the two orders are comparable in the number of occurrences of these words. The two word groups (terrorist/terrorism and refugee/immigrant) seem to be more and more synonymous in current dialogue on media outlets and social media, so I wanted to see their relationship in the context of the executive orders. Here is what I found:

  EO1 Total word count: 2869 EO2 Total word count: 6161
Word Count % word count Count % word count
terrorist 6 26
terrorism 10 21
Total 16 0.558% 47 0.763%
refugee 13 22
immigration 7 7
Total 20 0.697% 29 0.471%

 

The numbers show that there is a 0.2% increase in the use of the words “terrorist” or “terrorism” between the two orders. There was also a decrease in the number of instances the words “refugee” or “immigration” were used in the second order. Executive Order 13780 puts more emphasis on the idea of “terrorism” in relation to immigration and refugees, suggesting that the type of people coming into the States are first and foremost terrorists before they are anything else. This is an abstraction of an entire group of people, attributing qualities to them that are not generalizable. By suggesting that anyone who attempts to enter the United States is automatically a suspect of terrorism distorts the reality of the situation and enflames antagonistic attitudes towards refugees and immigrants. It is criminalization of the act of crossing the border into the United States and thus anyone who commits this act is placed in the category of criminally dangerous (aka a “terrorist”).

Other common umbrella terms used to refer to people entering the United States in the executive orders include “foreign nationals” (27%), “individuals” (17%), “aliens” (9%) etc. This systematic classification of people into generic categories and groups is problematic. By reducing the group of people entering the U.S. into one conglomerate mass, the need for recognition of diversity and variability is also reduced.

While analysis of word choice can give insight into the categorical attitudes the speaker is creating for people entering the United States, these words do not occur in isolation. They are embedded in clauses and sentences of which the structure gives further clue into the mindset of the speaker.

Sentence Structure Analysis

Sentence structure, or the way in which different elements of a sentence are configured in relation to each other, can provide insight into the roles each player in the sentence is undertaking and receiving. The subject of the sentence or the “doer” of the action versus the object of the verb or the “receiver” of the action and the actual verb or “action” of the sentence itself- all of these structural elements of a sentence are important in conveying the intended meaning by the speaker. In short, who does what to whom can be a window into how the speaker conceptualizes themselves in relation to others and vice versa.

In order to see what sorts of roles and action the speaker of the executive order gives to refugees and immigrants, I analyzed the most common parts of speech for the terms used to refer to people entering the US mentioned above. The results are as follows:

Part of Speech Count: Total (EO1/EO2)
Object of a preposition 92 (28/64)                            54%
Subject- active voice 27.16 (11.5/15.66)               16%
Direct Object 17.5 (10.5/7)                        10%
Subject- passive voice 13 (2/11)                               7.7%
Subject- copula 10.33 (3/7.33)                      6.1%
Possessive 5 (3/2)                                  3%
Subject complement nominative 3 (0/3)                                  1.8%
Adjective 1 (1/0)                                  0.6%
  Total words: 169

 

Over 50% of the references to people entering the U.S. are found in the object of a preposition position in the sentence. (An object of a preposition is a noun that comes after a preposition as in “the entry of foreign nationals” or “enter as refugees”. The words “of” and “as” are both prepositions and the words “foreign nationals” and “refugees” are embedded in the phrases as objects of the prepositions.) In fact, in both of the orders the most common position in the sentence for the term “foreign national” to appear in is “entry of foreign nationals.” The resulting structural position for the term “foreign nationals” (or any other term referring to people entering the country) is deep down in the sentence in phrases that are in turn part of larger clauses that make up whole sentences. They are buried deep within the construction of the sentence and relegated to passive, inactive roles.

When they do appear as subject of an active sentence (that is, they are the doer of an active verb as in “Tom walks to school” where “Tom” is the subject and “walks” is the active verb), the actions attributed to them are overwhelmingly negative:

 

List of active verb phrases attributed to persons entering the United States
Sought to infiltrate….

Use means to enter….

Intend to harm…

Have ties to terrorist groups….

Bear hostile attitudes…

Claim to be….

Traveling…

Seeking to enter the U.S…

Has the intent….

Pose a threat…

Warrant scrutiny….

Seeks to enter…

Can document…

Provided faithful and loyal service to U.S. gov’t…

Has connections with ISIS…

Commit, aid or support violent, criminal or terrorist acts

Present a risk of causing harm….

Seeking admission….

Undergo an in-person interview….

What does this tell us? The majority of the time, terms referring to people entering the U.S. are deep within the sentence structure in passive roles, being acted upon and moved around at will by the speaker. When they do appear in active positions, that is as the subject of an active verb, the action attributed to them is negative, dangerous or violent. They are given no agency other than the intent to do harm. Here again we see the abstraction of a group of people relegated into passivity or criminalized into violence.  In the end, it is not the individuals who matter so much as the entry into the United States. The ability of the U.S. government to exercise its power in deciding what and who crosses the border is much more important than the reason that crossing is even being made. It’s a power game that the U.S. is not willing to lose and thus the speaker in these orders asserts its active role over those trying to enter and justifies it by demonizing the group as a whole.

In Sum

From these observations, we can see that the language used to talk about people entering the United States makes broad categorizations about who is a “terrorist” and who is a “refugee,” criminalizes the act of entering the United States, and strips the agency (other than intent for harm) from anyone seeking to enter the country. And what IS said is just as important as what is NOT said. It is not mentioned that this big moving mass of dangerous “aliens” knocking down the door of the United States is actually made up of a kaleidoscope of men and women, families, potential community members, contributing individuals of talent and skill. Each person has a unique past they are fleeing, future they are pursing, needs they require and ability they possess. Unfortunately, this reality is ignored and distorted through language that abstracts and objectifies as we have seen in these two executive orders and as we hear daily in other social and media outlets.

Language is a tool or a weapon depending on how we intend to use it. We have the power to change our culture through language just as much as we have the power to create it through the same means. We can take a stand against reactionary language and strive for more inclusive, more empathetic language about refugees, keeping in mind that each individual has a unique set of circumstances and needs. Protecting ourselves and all others from those who do have the intent to do harm is a worthy goal, but grouping everyone into this category is not the way to fight against them. Instead of putting people immediately behind the bars of our language and attitudes, we can be more aware of how we treat refugees in our language and empower them to become our equal partners in building a strong and unified community instead of tearing them down and pushing them out.

 

The views and opinions expressed on the interACTION blog are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of the University of Utah or the College of Social Work.

Refugee Foster Care Case Manager

Location: Catholic Community Services of Utah, 745 E 300 S SLC UT 84102
Status: Non-exempt, Full-time, with benefits
Salary: $14.50-15.50 hr DOE

Catholic Community Services of Utah provides help and creates hope for thousands of people of all beliefs who are most in need in our community through Refugee Resettlement, Homeless Services and CCS of Northern Utah programs.

CCS offers an outstanding benefits package including group health insurance, dental, 401a and 403b retirement plans and a generous PTO/holiday schedule.

Job Description:
Assume primary responsibility for ensuring the service delivery system is responsive to all the needs of each refugee youth during the service period. Provision of case management services as outlined in the USCCB/MRS cooperative agreement, Reception and Placement regulations, state and federal regulations and in compliance with policies and procedures of Catholic Community Services Refugee Resettlement Program. All services provided in a manner that will facilitate self-sufficiency within the service period.

Responsibilities include:
1. Collaborate and cooperate with government, non-government, profit and non-profit agencies to ensure services for the refugee youths.
2. Documents what happens to refugees and to case coordination, agency interaction and interagency coordination efforts. Maintain case files in compliance with all state and federal regulations.
3. Complete monthly in-home visits with every foster youth assigned. Seek reports from foster parents on a monthly basis, therapists on a bi-monthly basis, and schools a minimum of once per semester.
4. Be available for some evening and weekend work, including being on call on for emergencies on a rotating schedule.
5. Assess youth’s progress in independent living skills, academic development, and adjustment to culture and set up any necessary supports.
6. Other duties as may be assigned.

Work Environment – inside/outside, office, warehouse, noise, temperature, etc.
1. Work will be performed primarily inside but will occur in youths’ homes, places of employment, educational institutes, and other locations as needed. Driving is required for this position.

Physical Demands including bending, sitting, lifting and driving
1. Work requires the ability to sit and stand for long periods, to walk moderate distances, to drive, and occasionally to assist youth with physical activities such as carrying groceries or household supplies.

Skills, knowledge and abilities:
1. Works independently. Demonstrates both problem solving and problem prevention.
2. Displays sensitivity to the needs of the youths, foster families, CCS staff, volunteers and other
persons with whom the employee may interact.
3. Proficiency in English oral and written communication.
4. Proficiency in computer skills that are required for the position.
5. Availability of an automobile with clean driving record, proof of current driver’s license, auto
insurance, and 21 years of age or older.

Education, training and or experience:
1. Bachelor’s degree in Social Work or a related field from an accredited institution.
2. Familiar with and supportive of the mission of Catholic Community Services of Utah and the vision of
the Catholic Church articulated by the diocesan bishop.
3. Experience with multi-cultural and refugee community.

Background Screen/BCI requirement
1. Ability to pass a BCI/FBI background check.

Licenses, certifications and credentials
1. SSW or CSW preferred.

Position status and expected schedule
1. The general schedule will consist of 40 hours worked Monday through Fridays between the hours of
8:30 AM and 8:00 PM.

DISCLAIMER STATEMENT: This job description lists typical examples of work and is not intended
to include every job duty and responsibility specific to a position. The employer reserves the right to
change or assign other duties to this position.
CCS is an equal opportunity employer.

To apply: Please go the company website: ccsutah.org and apply under the employment tab.
Position closes: Open until filled
Requisition #: 17.7.1

Dream Ambassadors!

The Dream Center at the University of Utah is hiring two Dream Ambassadors who will work with the Dream Center to increase access to higher education for undocumented students (with and without DACA) in Utah!

Dream Ambassadors will coordinate and execute workshops, presentations and trainings at the University of Utah campus, as well as partner with other organizations (i.e. PK-20 institutions, nonprofit organizations, conferences, etc.) to further fulfill the mission and goals of the Dream Center. Moreover, Dream Ambassadors will conduct research to develop audience-appropriate marketing materials to raise awareness of educational opportunities for all students, regardless of immigration status.

Who Qualifies?

  • Current University of Utah undergraduate students passionate about social justice and increasing access to higher education for undocumented students (with and without DACA) in Utah
  • Applicants must have DACA, or be eligible for employment in the U.S. (i.e. U.S. Citizen or Permanent Resident)

How to Apply?

Questions?

Foster Family Consultant

Location: Catholic Community Services of Utah, 745 E 300 S SLC UT 84102
Status: Non-exempt, Full-time, with benefits
Salary: $14.50-15.50 hr DOE

Catholic Community Services of Utah provides help and creates hope for thousands of people of all beliefs who are most in need in our community through Refugee Resettlement, Homeless Services and CCS of Northern Utah programs.

CCS offers an outstanding benefits package including group health insurance, dental, 401a and 403b retirement plans and a generous PTO/holiday schedule.

Job Description:
Train, support, and retain foster care families for the refugee foster care program and make recommendations to the program staff regarding these families.

Responsibilities include:
1. Help coordinate and prepare all pre-service training, screening, and initial education for foster family applicants. Teach pre-service courses as needed.
2. Provide evaluations and recommendations to the refugee foster care program staff regarding appropriateness of families for the program.
3. Assist in developing and coordinating foster family retention and continuing education activities.
4. Make twice-monthly home visits to all assigned foster families to ensure compliance with state and agency licensing standards and offer support to the families and youth.
5. Maintain case files for all assigned foster families.
6. Conduct intakes with all foster youth placed in assigned foster families within 48 hours of placement.
7. Coach assigned foster families in parenting skills and conflict resolution.
8. Assist foster families in obtaining and maintaining state foster care licensing.
9. Other duties as may be assigned.

Work Environment – inside/outside, office, warehouse, noise, temperature, etc.
1. Work will be performed primarily inside but will occur in youths’ homes, places of employment, educational institutes, and other locations as needed in addition to being performed in an office. Driving is required in this position.

Physical Demands including bending, sitting, lifting and driving
1. Work requires the ability to sit and stand for long periods, to walk moderate distances, to drive, and occasionally to assist youth with physical activities such as carrying groceries or household supplies.

Skills, knowledge and abilities:
1. Works independently in a safe, appropriate manner. Demonstrates both problem solving and problem prevention.
2. Demonstrated organizational, training, and parent coaching skills.
3. Consistently performs work assignments in a timely manner. Adheres to deadlines.
4. Proficiency in English oral and written communication.
5. Must maintain confidentiality regarding the youths.
6. Proficiency in computer skills that are required for the position.
7. Availability of an automobile with proof of current driver’s license, auto insurance, and 21 years of age or older.
8. Demonstrates cultural competency and a willingness to work with and learn from persons from different cultures.

Education, training and or experience:
1. Bachelor’s degree in Social Work or a related field from an accredited institution.
2. Experience with multi-cultural and refugee community.
3. Experience working with parents and families in a supportive capacity.
4. Experience working with youth, preferable in a foster care setting.

Background Screen/BCI requirement
1. Ability to pass a BCI/FBI background check.

Licenses, certifications and credentials
1. SSW or CSW preferred.

Position status and expected schedule
1. This position is non-exempt. The general schedule will consist of 40 hours to be worked on Monday through Fridays between the hours of 8:30 AM and 8:00 PM.

DISCLAIMER STATEMENT: This job description lists typical examples of work and is not intended to include every job duty and responsibility specific to a position. The employer reserves the right to change or assign other duties to this position. CCS is an equal opportunity employer.

To apply: Please go the company website: ccsutah.org and apply under the employment tab.
Position closes: Open until filled
Requisition #: 17.6.3

Refugee Foster Care Case Manager

CATHOLIC COMMUNITY SERVICES

Location: Catholic Community Services of Utah, 745 E 300 S SLC UT 84102
Status: Non-exempt, Full-time, with benefits
Salary: $14.50-15.50 hr DOE

Catholic Community Services of Utah provides help and creates hope for thousands of people of all beliefs who are most in need in our community through Refugee Resettlement, Homeless Services and CCS of Northern Utah programs.
CCS offers an outstanding benefits package including group health insurance, dental, 401a and 403b retirement plans and a generous PTO/holiday schedule.

Job Description:
Assume primary responsibility for ensuring the service delivery system is responsive to all the needs of each refugee youth during the service period. Provision of case management services as outlined in the USCCB/MRS cooperative agreement, Reception and Placement regulations, state and federal regulations and in compliance with policies and procedures of Catholic Community Services Refugee Resettlement Program. All services provided in a manner that will facilitate self-sufficiency within the service period.

Responsibilities include:
1. Collaborate and cooperate with government, non-government, profit and non-profit agencies to ensure services for the refugee youths.
2. Documents what happens to refugees and to case coordination, agency interaction and interagency coordination efforts. Maintain case files in compliance with all state and federal regulations.
3. Complete monthly in-home visits with every foster youth assigned. Seek reports from foster parents on a monthly basis, therapists on a bi-monthly basis, and schools a minimum of once per semester.
4. Be available for some evening and weekend work, including being on call on for emergencies on a rotating schedule.
5. Assess youth’s progress in independent living skills, academic development, and adjustment to culture and set up any necessary supports.
6. Other duties as may be assigned.
Work Environment – inside/outside, office, warehouse, noise, temperature, etc.
1. Work will be performed primarily inside but will occur in youths’ homes, places of employment, educational institutes, and other locations as needed. Driving is required for this position.

Physical Demands including bending, sitting, lifting and driving
1. Work requires the ability to sit and stand for long periods, to walk moderate distances, to drive, and occasionally to assist youth with physical activities such as carrying groceries or household supplies.

Skills, knowledge and abilities:
1. Works independently. Demonstrates both problem solving and problem prevention.
2. Displays sensitivity to the needs of the youths, foster families, CCS staff, volunteers and other persons with whom the employee may interact.
3. Proficiency in English oral and written communication.
4. Proficiency in computer skills that are required for the position.
5. Availability of an automobile with clean driving record, proof of current driver’s license, auto insurance, and 21 years of age or older.

Education, training and or experience:
1. Bachelor’s degree in Social Work or a related field from an accredited institution.
2. Familiar with and supportive of the mission of Catholic Community Services of Utah and the vision of the Catholic Church articulated by the diocesan bishop.
3. Experience with multi-cultural and refugee community.

Background Screen/BCI requirement
1. Ability to pass a BCI/FBI background check.

Licenses, certifications and credentials
1. SSW or CSW preferred.

Position status and expected schedule
1. The general schedule will consist of 40 hours worked Monday through Fridays between the hours of 8:30 AM and 8:00 PM.
DISCLAIMER STATEMENT: This job description lists typical examples of work and is not intended to include every job duty and responsibility specific to a position. The employer reserves the right to change or assign other duties to this position. CCS is an equal opportunity employer.

To apply: Please go the company website: ccsutah.org and apply under the employment tab.
Position closes: Open until filled
Requisition #: 17.6.2

“Objects of Resilience”

Message from the Director

By Annie Isabel Fukushima, PhD, Director of the Initiative for Transformative Social Work, University of Utah College of Social Work

 

“Objects of Resilience” is a project by the Initiative for Transformative Social Work (ITSW) at the University of Utah College of Social Work. The exhibit went on display on April 10, 2017, and will remain for the duration of the spring 2017 semester. It tells a story of migration through the objects in one’s life. As conveyed by feminist scholar Sara Ahmed, “to be oriented is also to be turned toward certain objects, those that help us find our way. These are the objects we recognize, so that when we face them we know which way we are facing.” Therefore, ITSW wanted to learn more about how the objects of resilience and migration are collectively orienting our students, faculty, staff, community, and even a community beyond Utah.

This exhibit speaks to pressing issues surrounding migration. The context of “Objects of Resilience” is one that is tethered to both micro and macro contexts. The call for submissions was circulating in February 2017; a time when the president was signing executive orders calling for stricter immigration laws that targeted vulnerable and marginalized communities: Muslims, people from South West Asia/the Arab Worlds, the Middle East, undocumented, refugees, and anyone whose body was read as Other and ineligible for citizenship. The impacts of the macro context shaped the students, community, and University at a local level – it impacted people’s individual lives. This exhibit pushes back against the reductive, violent and oppressive narrative that exists in the United States that problematically reduces migration and migrant experiences to colonial thinking as “us versus them” through practices of deportation, incarceration, and erasure.

Receiving over 30 submissions, we found that the contributors told a rich story of migration. ITSW students originally hoped that it would tell a story regarding the refugee experiences. However, in reaching out to the community for stories surrounding displacement and migration, the submissions oriented us toward a broader story of migration. The stories of resilience and migration are multiple – in fact, to lock it into a thematic would be to limit the connections across images, experience, and context. Therefore, the exhibit is organized by last name. In addition, as the viewer moves through the various images, we invite you to connect with a story of multiplicity, heterogeneity, hybridity, transnational connections, with multiple localized contexts. Through the multiple, these photos and stories speak to a resilience that is not singular or monolithic. “Objects of Resilience” makes appeals to the viewer to inhabit the role of the witness, where this witnessing sees and facilitates actions that center migration as encompassing a range of experiences and humanities. These objects encompass the familiar and unfamiliar. Moreover, through the objects the hope is that the viewers will connect with the complex personhood that defines the migrant experience. “Objects of Resilience” speaks to the object that migrants are turned into, the objects that are in our lives, and the objectification occurring in dominant narratives. Anti-oppressive work includes seeing the complex personhood that migrants inhabit and the radical possibilities of the border crosser, border dweller, and the transnational subject.

 

CLICK TO DOWNLOAD EXHIBIT PROGRAM

 

WARNING:  This exhibit contains strong language and images that some may find offensive.  In an effort to respect the educational and cultural context in which this exhibit is displayed, as well as respect the rights of the individuals whose work is represented, the College of Social Work has taken measures to notify exhibit visitors of sensitive content prior to its viewing.  The images and essays presented in this exhibit represent the stories and views of the individual artists and do not necessarily represent the views of the University of Utah, the College of Social Work, its students and employees, nor the other individuals whose work is displayed.

Coordinator, Administrative Program

The University of Utah

https://utah.peopleadmin.com/postings/59279

Details

Open Date 11/29/2016
Requisition Number PRN12979B
Job Title Coordinator, Administrative Program
Working Title Coordinator, Administrative Program
Job Grade D
FLSA Code Administrative
Patient Care Job Code? No
Standard Hours per Week 40
Work Schedule Summary Monday – Friday 8am-5pm. Some evenings and weekends.
Department 01490 – Outreach and Engagement
Type of Recruitment External Posting
Pay Rate Range 32000
Close Date

NOTE: May close at anytime.

Open Until Filled

NOTE: May close at anytime.

Yes
Job Summary Built on the foundation of educational equity and opportunity, the Dream Program Coordinator strives to empower undocumented students, their families and members of the community in being informed leaders and active participants in our communities. Continuing the Office of Engagements holistic college access pathways, this new Dream Program will strive to educate and build awareness of changing policies affecting Utah’s undocumented population. We acknowledge that immigration status is one aspect of an individual’s identity that does not solely define a person or their capacity. We promote a holistic approach to recruitment and retention of students in higher education, taking into account a student’s mental, emotional, and financial well-being.
The primary functions of the Dream Program Coordinator include student support, college access, campus network/awareness /advocacy, and community outreach. This is a new position and will be responsible for launching a full array of Dream Program.

Student Support: The Dream Program Coordinator will be the primary interface with undocumented and DACAmented students, providing them with in-depth, customized information to assist in the navigation of their educational careers. This professional staff member utilizes an understanding of college student development, learning, and persistence theories to assist new, transfer, and current students in developing plans to enhance their academic programs while at the University of Utah. Major responsibilities are to foster a successful transition to the university environment, identify services and resources for degree development that meet the student’s needs, assist students in identifying resources for major & career selection, and encourage timely graduation. Program staff endeavor to create a supportive and inclusive community wherein undocumented and DACAmented students can develop and thrive. This person will use their professional experience to mentor student teams in the creation and execution of education, advocacy and awareness projects.

College Access: The Dream coordinator will participate in college access efforts, providing expertise on DACA/undocumented student access. This staff member will attend college application and financial aid events to provide support and information to students and their families.

Campus Network, Awareness, & Advocacy: The Dream Program Coordinator will serve as campus network coordinator to promote collaboration and integration of services between campus entities. The incumbent will design and deliver training for faculty, staff, and administrators to better understand students’ strengths, barriers, opportunities, and experiences. The Dream Program Coordinator will create and manage the “UndocuAlly” campaign. The incumbent will represent student population in high-level university meetings, advocating for this student population and coordinating resources.

Community Outreach: The Dream Coordinator will work with community partners to provide information at community-based events. Information will range from awareness and advocacy for undocumented people, to college access information for students and families. The incumbent will build strong and effective community relationships that enhance student experiences at the U and promote pathways for future students to the U. Incumbent will develop a complete knowledge of community services and resources that can support students and families, and serve as the point-of-contact for community entities into the University and vice versa.

Responsibilities Specific elements of the work include:
1. Advise new, transfer, and continuing students and their families, linking them to campus opportunities to enhance their academic experience
2. Develop a working knowledge of University of Utah academic advising, financial aid, and career development office services and policies as they relate to this student population
3. Engage with departmental and program academic advisors to gain a working knowledge of program requirements to consider when assisting students in connecting with University resources and opportunities
4. Employ listening and advising practices to assist students from diverse backgrounds in accessing University resources and opportunities, and developing graduation plans
5. Assist students in accessing non-academic resources necessary to thrive, such as counseling, legal aid, housing, tax support, etc.
6. Document advising sessions and develop practices and procedures for following up with student advisees
7. Mentor Dreamers student group and connect student teams with outside resources
8. Develop resources (printed literature, web sites, videos, social media sites, etc.) to assist students in exploring opportunities to enhance their academic program at the University of Utah
9. Serve on University committees and make recommendations that affect advising processes, program development, and published materials
10. Engage in data compilation, analysis and reporting of program outcomes
11. Participate in information sessions, orientations, college application, financial aid, and tabling events on campus and in the community
12. Build a network of campus offices to understand, identify, and coordinate services targeted to this student population
13. Develop and deliver awareness training to staff, faculty, and students across campus, including managing the UndocuAlly campaign
14. Develop new programming and workshops specific to this population in in areas of legal, academic, financial, and mental health
15. Embrace rapid change and develop new solutions to meet evolving student needs
Incumbent is expected to possess a working knowledge about academic programs, policies and procedures, and student support services. The ability to be sensitive to the needs of diverse student populations, such as non-traditional and minority students and students with disabilities is a necessity. Incumbents must also be able to interpret student needs and determine when referral to other University resources is appropriate.
Minimum Qualifications Bachelor’s degree in a related field plus one year directly related experience or equivalency required. Demonstrated ability to work independently, analyze and make decisions related to program content. Strong coordination and organizational skills required to prioritize conflicting deadlines. Demonstrated human relations and effective communication skills are also required.

Applicants must demonstrate the potential ability to perform the essential functions of the job as outlined in the position description.

Preferences Bachelor’s degree in Social Work or a related field plus one year directly related experience or equivalency required.
Familiarity with DACA/Undocumented student success and a commitment to helping all students achieve their dreams. Working knowledge of laws and policies affecting undocumented student populations.
Evidence of successful work with a diverse range of students, including populations typically underrepresented in higher education (e.g. students of color, first-generation college students, LGBTQstudents, students with disabilities, and students from lower SES backgrounds)
Experience building effective working relationships and open communication with students, staff, faculty and University leadership
Ability to communicate effectively in writing and verbally to diverse audiences including administrators, faculty, students, and staff
Skills in decision making that allow for quick, informed, and appropriate decisions essential to understanding students’ needs and identifying where those needs can best be met
Ability to thrive in a rapidly evolving environment with a positive attitude, embracing change and adapting to student needs
Applicants must demonstrate the potential ability to perform the essential functions of the job as outlined in the position description
Type Benefited Staff
Additional Information
The University of Utah is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity employer and is committed to diversity in its workforce. In compliance with applicable federal and state laws, University of Utah policy of equal employment opportunity prohibits discrimination on the basis of race or ethnicity, religion, color, national origin, sex, age, sexual orientation, gender identity/expression, veteran’s status, status as a qualified person with a disability, or genetic information. Individuals from historically underrepresented groups, such as minorities, women, qualified persons with disabilities, and protected veterans are strongly encouraged to apply. Veterans’ preference is extended to qualified applicants, upon request and consistent with University policy and Utah state law.
To inquire about this posting, email: employment@utah.edu or call 801-581-2300. Reasonable accommodations in the application process will be provided to qualified individuals with disabilities. To request an accommodation or for further information about University AA/EO policies, please contact the Office of Equal Opportunity and Affirmative Action, 201 S. Presidents Cr., Rm 135, (801) 581-8365 (V/TDD), email: oeo@umail.utah.edu.

The University is a participating employer with Utah Retirement Systems (“URS”). To be eligible for retirement contributions, you must be hired into a benefit-eligible position. Certain new hires are automatically assigned to the URS retirement plan and other employees with prior URS service, may elect to enroll in the URS within 30 days of hire. Regardless of whether they are hired into a benefit-eligible position or not, individuals who previously retired and are receiving monthly retirement benefits from URS must notify the Benefits Department upon hire. Please contact Utah Retirement Systems at (801)366-7770 or (800)695-4877 or the University’s Benefits Department at (801)581-7447 for information.

This position may require the successful completion of a criminal background check and/or drug screen.

Special Instructions Summary The Office of Engagement and the University of Utah value interactions among individuals with varying traditions, cultures, identities, expressions, orientation, religious beliefs, economic backgrounds, and racial/ethnic origins. We strongly encourage applications from candidates who will share and explore this value with our team and the students we serve.